Tag: research

New journals accepted into the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)

New journals accepted into the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)

We are very excited to announce that, after a lot of hard work at the University of Huddersfield Press offices, and a lot of very helpful guidance, we now have 4 journals accepted into the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)!

We would like to say a big thank you to the DOAJ team for being helpful and supportive throughout the process, and we are very happy to see these high quality, open access journals, indexed and discoverable on the DOAJ platform.

 Journal of Creative Music Systems Tick icon: journal was accepted after March 2014​​
In DOAJ?Yes
ISSN(s): 2399-7656
Date added to DOAJ: 2019-05-30
Home pagehttps://www.jcms.org.uk/
LicenseCC BY-NC-ND
Publisher: University of Huddersfield Press
Platform, Host, Aggregator: Janeway
Classification: Music, Computer software
Keywords: music, creative music systems, computational creative systems
Started publishing Open Access content in: 2016
Country: United Kingdom
Language: EN
Submit an update
 Teaching in Lifelong Learning: A Journal to Inform and Improve Practice Tick icon: journal was accepted after March 2014​​
In DOAJ?Yes
ISSN(s): 2040-0993, 2049-4181
Date added to DOAJ: 2014-11-24
Home pagehttps://www.teachinginlifelonglearning.org.uk
LicenseCC BY-NC-ND
Publisher: University of Huddersfield Press
Platform, Host, Aggregator: Janeway
Classification: Special aspects of education
Keywords: education, lifelong learning, higher education
Started publishing Open Access content in: 2011
Country: United Kingdom
Language: EN
Submit an update
 Journal of Performance Magic Tick icon: journal was accepted after March 2014​​
In DOAJ?Yes
ISSN(s): 2051-6037
Date added to DOAJ: 2015-05-13
Home pagehttp://eprints.hud.ac.uk/journal/jpm/
LicenseCC BY
Publisher: University of Huddersfield Press
Platform, Host, Aggregator: Eprints
Classification: The performing arts. Show business
Keywords: performing arts, magic
Started publishing Open Access content in: 2013
Country: United Kingdom
Language: EN
Submit an update
 Crime, Security and Society Tick icon: journal was accepted after March 2014​​
In DOAJ?Yes
ISSN(s): 2398-130X
Date added to DOAJ: 2019-08-13
Home pagehttps://www.crimesecurityandsociety.org.uk/
LicenseCC BY
Publisher: University of Huddersfield Press
Platform, Host, Aggregator: Janeway
Classification: Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology
Keywords: crime, security, society, criminal investigation, forensic sciences
Started publishing Open Access content in: 2018
Country: United Kingdom
Language: EN
Submit an update
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What role does ambient music have in society and in musical culture? A new book explores how the genre has developed over the last 40 years

What role does ambient music have in society and in musical culture? A new book explores how the genre has developed over the last 40 years

Today sees the release of a brand new book looking at how the genre of ambient music has developed over the last 40 years.

Music Beyond Airports: Appraising Ambient Music

Contributions by: Monty Adkins, Axel Berndt, Lisa Colton, Simon Cummings, Ambrose Field, Ulf Holbrook, Justin Morey, Richard Talbot, David Toop

ISBN10-13 eBook: 1862181616 Print: 9781862181618

Buy a print copy  Download the open access version

This collection of essays has been assembled and developed from papers given at the Ambient@40 International Conference held in February 2018 at the University of Huddersfield. The original premise of the conference was not merely to celebrate Eno’s work and the landmark release of Music for Airports in 1978, but to consider the development of the genre, how it has permeated our wider musical culture, and what the role of such music is today given the societal changes that have occurred since the release of that album.

In the context of the conference, ambient was considered from the perspectives of aesthetic, influence, appropriation, process, strategy and activity. A detailed consideration of each of these topics could fill many volumes. With that in mind, this book does not seek to provide an in-depth analysis of each of these topics or a comprehensive history of the last 40 years of ambient music. Rather it provides a series of provocations, observations and reflections that each open up seams for further discussion. As such, this book should be read as a starting point for future research, one that seeks to critically interrogate the very meaning of ‘ambient’, how it creates its effect, and how the genre can remain vital and relevant in twenty-first century music-making.

Chapter list

INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER 1 – David Toop

How Much World Do You Want? Ambient Listening And Its Questions

CHAPTER 2 – Ambrose Field

Space In The Ambience: Is Ambient Music Socially Relevant?

CHAPTER 3 – Ulf Holbrook

A Question Of Background: Sites Of Listening

CHAPTER 4 – Richard Talbot

Three Manifestations Of Spatiality In Ambient Music

CHAPTER 5 – Simon Cummings

The Steady State Theory: Recalibrating The Quiddity Of Ambient Music

CHAPTER 6 – Monty Adkins

Fragility, Noise, And Atmosphere In Ambient Music

CHAPTER 7 – Lisa Colton

Channelling The Ecstasy Of Hildegard Von Bingen: “O Euchari” Remixed

CHAPTER 8 – Justin Morey

Ambient House: “Little Fluffy Clouds” And The Sampler As Time Machine

CHAPTER 9 – Axel Berndt

Adaptive Game Scoring With Ambient Music

Buy a print copy  Download the open access version

New issue of the Journal of Performance and Mindfulness

New issue of the Journal of Performance and Mindfulness

The new issue of our popular journal Performance and Mindfulness has arrived! The new issue focuses on the importance of spirituality within dramatic performance and asks for its readers to re-think individual meditation. It considers how meditation and Buddhist practices are important in the execution of the dramatic arts.

This issue is a fantastic read for those who are keen performers interested in physicality and mindfulness, but it may also spark interest in those who are keen to broaden their horizons within their own perspectives of spirituality. The articles cover all corners of performance art, including;

Performance and Mindfulness includes original work from researchers at the University of Huddersfield, but also from academics across the globe. Read on to discover a wide range of perspectives on what spirituality within performance means to the individual, and how it manifests and expresses itself within other cultures and the independent performer.

Volume 2 Issue 1 of Perfomance and Mindfulness

New issue of Teaching in Lifelong Learning

New issue of Teaching in Lifelong Learning

Volume 8 Issue 2 of Teaching in Lifelong Learning is out now.

This issue of TiLL is somewhat different from previous ones in that it is a special edition publishing four papers by project teams who were involved in The Education & Training Foundation’s (ETF) funded Outstanding Teaching Learning and Assessment (OTLA) Phase 3 programme in the north-east and Cumbria. I had the privilege of being the evaluator for the programme and very early on I offered to publish papers in a special edition of TiLL, and I am delighted that five of the project teams accepted my invitation and submitted their papers for review.

David Powell, Editor of Teaching in Lifelong Learning

University of Huddersfield Press first to launch with Janeway – a new open source publishing platform for open access research

University of Huddersfield Press first to launch with Janeway – a new open source publishing platform for open access research

We are excited and proud to be the first university press to officially launch on the new Janeway publishing platform – all our publications are now available open access on the new platform, which offers a beautifully designed and highly intuitive reader and author experience.

Working with the Open Library of Humanities

Today is the culmination for over 12 months of hard work behind the scenes to get the platform ready, and we would like to thank Martin Paul Eve, Andy Byers and Mauro Sanchez for their endless enthusiasm for the vast amount of work involved. The team at the Open Library of Humanities, based in Birkbeck, University of London’s Centre for Technology and Publishing, have been supportive throughout the process and we are thrilled to have a portfolio of journals and monographs now all available on the new platform.

Professor Martin Paul Eve, CEO of OLH and Director of Birkbeck’s Centre for Technology and Publishing said:

“we are thrilled to be able to collaborate with Huddersfield University Press. When we started the Janeway project, it was for our internal use; we simply wanted an open-source platform that we could control ourselves. For others to now benefit from that same system allows us to spread the infrastructural side of open access much further than we would otherwise have been able.”

Celebrating the success of the University of Huddersfield Press

To announce the launch of the platform, and to mark the recent achievements of the Press, Huddersfield’s Deputy Vice-Chancellor Professor Tim Thornton, Chair of the University Press Board, opened a celebration event this morning attended by Deans, Directors, authors and editors. The Press has recently achieved two impressive milestones in research dissemination:

  • Over 100,000 article downloads (since 2016)
  • Over 6000 book downloads (since 2016)

This is a significant achievement and shows how the Press can play a part in ensuring high quality research is accessible for everyone. We look forward to seeing the dissemination and impact of our publications improve even further as we publish our new content on this improved platform.

 

 

Sharing university press practices – our initial findings

Sharing university press practices – our initial findings

At the end of June 2018 we held an event here in Huddersfield which aimed to bring together university presses, or those considering launching a press, to discuss the challenges we face as a community, and hopefully find some useful and innovative ways to share best practices and experiences.

Thank you for coming!

I would first like to thank everyone who attended that day – we had 18 people come, representing 15 different institutions, all of whom brought an amazing amount of experience and knowledge to the sessions that day. It was rewarding to be part of some really engaging and innovative discussions, and you all got really stuck into the different activities we had planned, so thank you.

Also a big thank you to Graham Stone from Jisc, who came to chat about all the work they are doing around developing resources and frameworks for university presses to use when setting up and approaching third parties.

Since then, I have been working (with my colleague Kathrine Jensen), behind the scenes at pulling together all the information we gathered that day, with the aim of collating some themes and potential recommendations that can be used by the university press community.

Initial summary of findings

We have carried out some thematic qualitative analysis of the data gathered from each session, and have grouped our findings into three main categories:

  • Key considerations for a university press launch/development
  • Identifying and building strategic stakeholder relationships
  • Designing and implementing a sustainable publishing process

We are also planning to do some reflection work around the methods used for gathering data in the sessions. We tried out a number of techniques and thought the majority worked really well. We will be sharing some of these experiences in a future piece of research, potentially focusing on our use of the reflection river, based on the Kawa river model.

University press strategy infographic

An additional output of this research is going to be an infographic to visually convey the findings and recommendations mentioned above, in a format which we hope is accessible and highly shareable via social media and other online networks.

What comes next?

We have plenty more work to do on writing up our findings and the community recommendation you all came up with under each of these headings, but I wanted to share with you this initial summary to create a chance for your input on where we are so far.

Please do get in touch if you have questions or feedback:

Megan Taylor, University of Huddersfield Press Manager m.taylor2@hud.ac.uk 

Kathrine S.H. Jensen, Independent Researcher, kathrineshjensen@gmail.com

We hope to have the infographic ready over the next month, but in the meantime, if you have any feedback or would like to know more about our progress with this research, please let me know.

New book! Soundings: documentary film and the listening experience

New book! Soundings: documentary film and the listening experience

We are delighted today to announce the publication of our newest book, a beautifully written collection edited by Geoffrey Cox and John Corner:

Soundings: documentary film and the listening experience

Buy the paperback version

Download the open access version

It has been a privilege to work with Geoffrey and John on this fascinating collection of essays, and we asked them to put a few words together about their research and the driving force behind the book.

Geoffrey Cox and John Corner explore the arts of sound, investigating the richness of what we hear as well as what we see in non-fiction films.

We all recognise that sound is important to documentary films, without it we would often have no idea of what we were looking at or of its significance. What is far less recognised is the often complex ways in which our listening becomes interlinked with our viewing so as to generate feelings and ideas well beyond those carried simply in ‘what is said’. This is partly a matter of how documentary producers work to let us hear the world as well as see it, a world of noises, natural, and mechanical and of patterns and textures of speech going well beyond the literal content of commentary or interview. The sonic dimension involves a range of technological and aesthetic creativity in the production process right through from initial recording through to final editing. Often, it importantly involves the use of music in ways which we might be encouraged to register but which will often work powerfully in the background, shaping the kinds of knowledge and pleasure we get from a film without our being consciously aware of it.

A huge range of non-fiction film uses sounds in this way to guide and supplement our visual experience and fill it with feeling. The longstanding practices of film, television and now web advertising show a range of sound designs importantly at work, so too do the even more longstanding techniques of film propaganda. However, many documentary and video makers, rather than reinforce the delivery of a narrow message, have wanted to use the possibilities of different sounds to enrich, make more complex and perhaps even challenge, the sense of reality ‘coming through’.

In our work, drawing on international contributors including film-makers and composers as well as academics, we ask questions about how sounds are recorded and assembled in documentary production, about the variety of the ways in which they work when listened to and about their contribution to making this area of visual culture an important culture of sounds too. Our belief is that further critical attention here goes beyond the expanding area of documentary scholarship and connects with a broader understanding of the contemporary media arts.

Buy the paperback version

Download the open access version