Tag: publishing

Happy World Poetry Day – sneak preview

Happy World Poetry Day – sneak preview

As today is #WorldPoetryDay we thought it apt to do a preview of our newest book, I You He She It – Experiments in Viewpoint. This beautiful collection of prose and poetry is compiled by the School of Music, Humanities and Media at the University of Huddersfield and brings together established writers and emerging talent from all over the UK.

You can order the book in print or access the full open access version on our website.

Here is one of the poems from the book, by poet Gaia Holmes.

It

It made her want to drink the last of the Christmas sherry, climb over the park railings after midnight and cry at Adonis’s feet.

It made him want to phone in sick and spend the rest of the day in bed with her eating treacle sponge and custard, playing chess.

It made them want to go to the next alcoholics anonymous meeting.

It made him want to go to the woods with a week’s supply of cream crackers, tinned sardines and his dead grandmother’s fat three-stone bible.

It made him want to pull out his tubes, curse at the nurses and shuffle to the gardens to smoke a cigarette.

It made them want to adopt.

It made her want to touch his wife’s breasts to see if they were real.

It made them want to drive to the seaside on a rainy day, park up on the cliff top, eat egg mayonnaise sandwiches, drink tea from a thermos flask and watch the grey waves curling and rolling through the steamy windows.

It made him want to apologise.

It made her want to murder.

It made her want to wear Doc Martens and a chiffon dress the colour of ostrich steak.

It made him want to go to the library and borrow a book on goat husbandry.

It made her want to paint all the windows with bitumen, burn all his letters and cry for six weeks.

It made him want to eat fried rice with a pair of tweezers.

It made them want to slow-roast the placenta in a casserole dish with Bisto, onions and leeks.

It made him want to pour treacle into the toecaps of all his trainers.

It made him want to teach his Jack Russell how to iron.

It made her want to set fire to her Barbie doll’s hair.

It made her want to move to Russia, gorge on roast turnips and black bread and become comfortably fat.

It made him want to stroke her clavicles.

It made her want to wear a fake moustache at the wedding reception.

It made him want to curl up in a fist at the bottom of her bed.

It made him want to steal a wedge of Brie from Sainsbury’s deli counter.

It made her want to sell her soul on eBay.

It made her want to try it when her parents were out.

It made him want to think about it for a long time in the bath.

It made them want to forget about it and get on with their lives.

 

 

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Author spotlight: how important are nuptial agreements?

Author spotlight: how important are nuptial agreements?

Paralegal Helen Newman has recently published an article about her research in our student research journal Fields. We caught up with her for a chat about her work and her experiences getting published.

I am not a writer, not really. I am a case loaded paralegal working for a specialist criminal practice. I may write the occasional blog post for work based upon cases I have managed but for the most part my writing is restricted to Briefs to counsel, Statements and Letters with the occasional Application to court. I returned to University as a mature student to do the Graduate Diploma in Law – urged to do so by my employer and family – so getting my head around writing from an academic perspective was a challenge in itself. The article on prenuptial agreements is based upon my dissertation on the same subject. I have to admit that my choice of dissertation subject was guided by my desire to structure my study – this felt like a topic I could remain focused on – unlike something like medical negligence where I feared I could end up going off on a tangent. Working in a criminal practice I had no involvement in family law to be aware of the increasing desire of parties to protect their assets ahead of marriage and very much thought of ‘pre-nups’ as something for the rich and famous, for celebrities, but as I researched the subject I was fascinated to discover the popularity of them across Europe and found I really got into the topic. It did seem nonsensical that business partners can sign a contract but life partners couldn’t, or rather that the court would consider them differently.

My research involved me becoming familiar with a new area of law, and a new style of writing. In Criminal practice I may read a few articles but the focus is more on court judgements, so I had to get used to reading family law journals and books on the subject – often with quite political undertones. It was interesting to have the opportunity to consider different viewpoints on the same case – though in many ways it appeared that the judgement itself was welcomed, more that the authors differed on the difference it would actually make going forward. I had also never had to read government white papers before – this in itself was an experience – as there seemed to be several all saying the same thing for much of the papers. Nor was I used to things being so open at the end of a matter – in the criminal law a higher court gives its ruling and that stands until challenged – this was about investigating the possibility of a required change to the law – with the final outcome seeming to be that there was no actual outcome and that further consultation may be needed in the future.

The opportunity to develop my dissertation into an article for publication was an exciting, if not daunting, one. Not only did it require a different style of writing, free of legal jargon, but it also needed me to expand upon some areas whilst removing others as I still had a word count limit! It was a brilliant experience, especially having the copywriter’s feedback to highlight where I needed to make things clearer. I would certainly urge anyone who is given this opportunity to go for it!

Read Helen’s article in Volume 3 of Fields

London Book Fair 2017 – academic publishing

London Book Fair 2017 – academic publishing

For many publishers and authors this week the big event is London Book Fair. Running from the 14th-16th March in Olympia in London, this year there will be over 25000 visitors from 124 different countries.

Although we won’t be there this year I thought it might be handy to do a quick roundup of the research/academic activities going on during the fair.

Follow the LBF Blog

First of all, keep up to date by checking out the London Book Fair Blog – there are some great posts on there from Alastair Horne who gives a monthly summary of academic publishing news

Research and Scholarly Publishing Forum

If you are attending #LBF2017 be sure to register for the Research and Scholarly Publishing Forum on the 15th March:

Research and scholarly publishing faces unprecedented change. Digitisation has turned the concept of territoriality and the supply chain upside down. Different international approaches to funding in higher education and research mandates are not only affecting institutions, but also publishers.

What are these trends and what do they mean for scholarly publishing?

Join industry leaders as they share their global perspectives and strategic insight into the latest policy, publishing models and technologies.

Insights Seminar Programme

As part of the Insights Seminar Programme there is also a Scholarly Stream with 13 sessions running Tuesday -Thursday covering subjects including authentication, copyright, journal sales, technology in book publishing and open access publishing.

Grab a discount

We are offering our readers 50% off our print books during #LBF17 – just select the student option at the checkout to get a bargain!

 

Stay connected

Finally, download the LBF app to make your visit a socially connected one. The app helps you find your way around and schedule your days, but also lets you connect with other visitors to the fair and follow social media streams to keep up to date.

Author spotlight: how does shift work affect healthcare students?

Author spotlight: how does shift work affect healthcare students?

Healthcare student Geri Gee has recently published an article about her research in our student research journal Fields. We caught up with her for a chat about her work and her experiences getting published.

How would you explain your research to someone new to the subject?

My research was designed to address the needs of healthcare students undergoing an academic degree, in order to practice in their relevant field, such as; nursing/ midwifery. It was evident from a literature review that there was little to no research supporting and identifying the impact of shift work on healthcare students. The literature review highlighted significant implications to shift work, therefore the team I worked with felt it necessary to explore how these implications could affect a healthcare professional so prematurely in their career and how these implications would impact on the future health of individuals and that of the national health service and its retention of healthcare professionals.

As a first time author, how did you find the process of getting published?

Having my work chosen to be published was very exciting. The step by step process required a fair amount of my personal time, in between applying for and commencing new employment. It was an educational process that was supported by the Press, who were very instructive and succinct in their advice. It was a both challenging and rewarding process.

How do you think this experience has helped you develop new skills?

Publishing my article has educated me on the difference between writing an assignment and writing for an academic journal. I feel that the process has encouraged me to consider further study and given me a drive to become involved in clinical research as the impact of the outcomes can be of a significant nature. I believe that my writing skills have improved alongside my skills to review reliability of research, which ensures practice based reading contributes to changing my personal practice, committing to meeting the current needs of the service users.

Read Geri’s article in Volume 3 of Fields

Noise in and as Music -an open access success

Noise in and as Music -an open access success

It has been over 14 months since the publication of one of our first open access books: Noise in and as Music, and with #OAWeek in full swing it feels like a perfect time to get reflective and see how the book is doing in its second year.

Noise was published as both a print book to order online, and an open access eBook version which can be downloaded from the University Repository completely free of charge. The idea was to open up the readership potential and make sure that this high quality research publication was made accessible to academics, professionals, members of the public, artists and anyone with an interest in the relationship between noise and music.

Order a print copy      Download the eBook

Open access publishing reaches a wider audience

The book has been successful as a print book, but even more so as an open access book. With over 3500 downloads so far, this innovative piece of research provides a cross-section of current explorations of noise and music which is clearly of interest to a wide audience.

Also received well by specialist music critics, Noise was reviewed for Tempo: A quarterly review of new music

The book is ordered, considered and thoughtful, and it is about noise in its various contradictory and untidy aspects. The fact that noise has been so theorised is itself curious and indicative. The dilemma is an oscillation between, on the one hand, the well-worn atavistic, even anti intellectual stance of many a noise provocateur’s PR, and, on the other, a desire to make the unintelligible speak, or to speak unimaginable desires, or the desire to destabilise entrenched structures… Thankfully, the book resists any impulse towards totalising and neat theorising, keeping an unruly plurality at play. Each of the contributors offers a partial perspective, addressing a particular facet of the n-dimensionality of Noise.

Seth Ayyaz Bhunnoo TEMPO 68 (269) 90–99 © 2014 Cambridge University Press

 

 

How can Kudos help you to share your research?

Have you come across Kudos yet? We have been working with Kudos since their launch in 2014 and have been seeing some great results for researchers at Huddersfield.

Kudos was created to provide a set of tools for academics, their institutions and publishers to measure the impact that their articles are having, and to allow the authors to take action to increase the impact. These actions include explaining their work to lay audiences, creating an impact statement, adding a short title to aid skimming, translations of key metadata to aid discoverability, linking to relevant resources such as blogs/videos/press releases, and using tools to share their work through social and traditional media. The results of these actions are measurable and all link the reader back to the version of record on the publisher’s site.

Smith, David (2013-12-17). “What is Kudos? An Interview with David Sommer, Co-Founder”. The Scholarly Kitchen. Retrieved 2016-10-24.

Have a look at this handy infographic to see how using Kudos is helping Huddersfield researchers to share their work

Huddersfield Kudos Infographic
Huddersfield Kudos Infographic

Open Access Week 2016

All this week we are celebrating open access research and publications as part of #OAWeek. We will be sharing links to events and discussions going on throughout the week, and also holding a special giveaway of some of our open access titles.

Follow us on Twitter to get involved: @HudUniPress

open-access-week-oct2016-print