Tag: Press

Author spotlight: solving power issues in engineering

Author spotlight: solving power issues in engineering

Engineering student Nick Horne has recently published an article about his research in our student research journal Fields. We caught up with him for a chat about his work and his experiences getting published.

How would you explain your research to someone new to the subject?

I would explain my research as a methodical approach to an engineering problem, starting with the objectives of the proposed solution in order to gain an understanding of what is required. It was important to understand the problems effecting power system quality, which the project aimed to address, as well as their causes and countermeasures, in order to understand the purpose of the system and produce a good technical report. My research covered the existing technology available, found the best suited to the application and evaluated the results against the highest benchmark I had access to.

As a first time author, how did you find the process of getting published?

I found the process of being published interesting and relatively straightforward. The editors of the journal were very helpful and constructive with their comments and suggestions which my work benefitted from. Ample time and support was given which made the process of writing my article enjoyable and ensured it was of the highest quality I could achieve. The whole experience has been rewarding and I’m proud that my work was selected for publishing in Fields.

How do you think this experience has helped you develop new skills?

The experience taught me how to better structure my sentences and make the journal flow better for the reader, better grammar and punctuation made the article easier to read. My journal was based on my final year project report which was a considerably larger body of work; this experience therefore provided experience in extracting key information and creating a more concise article. It also meant I was able to identify what information from my report would be suited to an academic style paper, adapting certain sections to explain terminology and provide context. Writing for a wider audience, with the aim to interest and educate the reader, was a challenge I enjoyed throughout the process.

Read Nick’s article in Volume 3 of Fields

Author spotlight: how do crystals protect our drinking water?

Author spotlight: how do crystals protect our drinking water?

Chemistry student Laura Lo has recently published an article about her research in our student research journal Fields. We caught up with her for a chat about her work and her experiences getting published.

If I was to explain my research to someone new to the subject, I would firstly ask them if they ever thought about the process of clean tap water. We wash, drink and cook with it, but this water has been recycled for 4.6 billion years. You would hope it’s clean! Now, my project is not just about water, it’s also about growing big shiny crystals. Now I know what you’re thinking, how do crystals have anything to do with water? Well, you see, water travels through pipes to reach our taps; however a time before lead poisoning was more understood, houses built before the 1970s used lead pipes that connected to the mains. At present most pipes have been replaced, although water companies will also use a water treatment called phosphate dosing which stops traces of lead leaching from any remaining lead pipes – there are still quite a few! This action results in the formation of a white precipitate which coats the inner pipe, therefore protecting the water. This white precipitate is the crystals! So in a nut shell my project was to develop a new method to grow pure large versions of these crystals in a controlled environment to enable future research in understanding their properties and how they act in the way they do to protect the water and inevitably, us.

I have to admit, the process for Fields was very quick in terms of getting published, before you know it 6 months have passed and you’re handed your final proof albeit lots of back and forth communication and changes that need to be made to your article. The whole experience was one of a kind, you spend your time writing a piece of work that was originally only meant as an essay or dissertation to be read by one or two people, but then it gets chosen to go forward to Fields, and your work suddenly gets critiqued and peer reviewed by experts who decide whether your paper is publishable. But it’s all worth it, seeing how far that piece of work has come, from final year dissertation with a few spelling mistakes here and there (I’m a scientist!) to published journal worthy; it’s a great motivational story to tell.

It’s a massive accomplishment for me, as it’s a rarity to get your paper published as an undergraduate and I am very grateful I have been given this opportunity to share my research and findings. I found this project fascinating and gratifying throughout, therefore I hope you enjoy reading it as much as I enjoyed writing it.

Read Laura’s article in Volume 3 of Fields

London Book Fair 2017 – academic publishing

London Book Fair 2017 – academic publishing

For many publishers and authors this week the big event is London Book Fair. Running from the 14th-16th March in Olympia in London, this year there will be over 25000 visitors from 124 different countries.

Although we won’t be there this year I thought it might be handy to do a quick roundup of the research/academic activities going on during the fair.

Follow the LBF Blog

First of all, keep up to date by checking out the London Book Fair Blog – there are some great posts on there from Alastair Horne who gives a monthly summary of academic publishing news

Research and Scholarly Publishing Forum

If you are attending #LBF2017 be sure to register for the Research and Scholarly Publishing Forum on the 15th March:

Research and scholarly publishing faces unprecedented change. Digitisation has turned the concept of territoriality and the supply chain upside down. Different international approaches to funding in higher education and research mandates are not only affecting institutions, but also publishers.

What are these trends and what do they mean for scholarly publishing?

Join industry leaders as they share their global perspectives and strategic insight into the latest policy, publishing models and technologies.

Insights Seminar Programme

As part of the Insights Seminar Programme there is also a Scholarly Stream with 13 sessions running Tuesday -Thursday covering subjects including authentication, copyright, journal sales, technology in book publishing and open access publishing.

Grab a discount

We are offering our readers 50% off our print books during #LBF17 – just select the student option at the checkout to get a bargain!

 

Stay connected

Finally, download the LBF app to make your visit a socially connected one. The app helps you find your way around and schedule your days, but also lets you connect with other visitors to the fair and follow social media streams to keep up to date.