Tag: ~Open Access

Author spotlight: how do crystals protect our drinking water?

Author spotlight: how do crystals protect our drinking water?

Chemistry student Laura Lo has recently published an article about her research in our student research journal Fields. We caught up with her for a chat about her work and her experiences getting published.

If I was to explain my research to someone new to the subject, I would firstly ask them if they ever thought about the process of clean tap water. We wash, drink and cook with it, but this water has been recycled for 4.6 billion years. You would hope it’s clean! Now, my project is not just about water, it’s also about growing big shiny crystals. Now I know what you’re thinking, how do crystals have anything to do with water? Well, you see, water travels through pipes to reach our taps; however a time before lead poisoning was more understood, houses built before the 1970s used lead pipes that connected to the mains. At present most pipes have been replaced, although water companies will also use a water treatment called phosphate dosing which stops traces of lead leaching from any remaining lead pipes – there are still quite a few! This action results in the formation of a white precipitate which coats the inner pipe, therefore protecting the water. This white precipitate is the crystals! So in a nut shell my project was to develop a new method to grow pure large versions of these crystals in a controlled environment to enable future research in understanding their properties and how they act in the way they do to protect the water and inevitably, us.

I have to admit, the process for Fields was very quick in terms of getting published, before you know it 6 months have passed and you’re handed your final proof albeit lots of back and forth communication and changes that need to be made to your article. The whole experience was one of a kind, you spend your time writing a piece of work that was originally only meant as an essay or dissertation to be read by one or two people, but then it gets chosen to go forward to Fields, and your work suddenly gets critiqued and peer reviewed by experts who decide whether your paper is publishable. But it’s all worth it, seeing how far that piece of work has come, from final year dissertation with a few spelling mistakes here and there (I’m a scientist!) to published journal worthy; it’s a great motivational story to tell.

It’s a massive accomplishment for me, as it’s a rarity to get your paper published as an undergraduate and I am very grateful I have been given this opportunity to share my research and findings. I found this project fascinating and gratifying throughout, therefore I hope you enjoy reading it as much as I enjoyed writing it.

Read Laura’s article in Volume 3 of Fields

Noise in and as Music -an open access success

Noise in and as Music -an open access success

It has been over 14 months since the publication of one of our first open access books: Noise in and as Music, and with #OAWeek in full swing it feels like a perfect time to get reflective and see how the book is doing in its second year.

Noise was published as both a print book to order online, and an open access eBook version which can be downloaded from the University Repository completely free of charge. The idea was to open up the readership potential and make sure that this high quality research publication was made accessible to academics, professionals, members of the public, artists and anyone with an interest in the relationship between noise and music.

Order a print copy      Download the eBook

Open access publishing reaches a wider audience

The book has been successful as a print book, but even more so as an open access book. With over 3500 downloads so far, this innovative piece of research provides a cross-section of current explorations of noise and music which is clearly of interest to a wide audience.

Also received well by specialist music critics, Noise was reviewed for Tempo: A quarterly review of new music

The book is ordered, considered and thoughtful, and it is about noise in its various contradictory and untidy aspects. The fact that noise has been so theorised is itself curious and indicative. The dilemma is an oscillation between, on the one hand, the well-worn atavistic, even anti intellectual stance of many a noise provocateur’s PR, and, on the other, a desire to make the unintelligible speak, or to speak unimaginable desires, or the desire to destabilise entrenched structures… Thankfully, the book resists any impulse towards totalising and neat theorising, keeping an unruly plurality at play. Each of the contributors offers a partial perspective, addressing a particular facet of the n-dimensionality of Noise.

Seth Ayyaz Bhunnoo TEMPO 68 (269) 90–99 © 2014 Cambridge University Press

 

 

How can Kudos help you to share your research?

Have you come across Kudos yet? We have been working with Kudos since their launch in 2014 and have been seeing some great results for researchers at Huddersfield.

Kudos was created to provide a set of tools for academics, their institutions and publishers to measure the impact that their articles are having, and to allow the authors to take action to increase the impact. These actions include explaining their work to lay audiences, creating an impact statement, adding a short title to aid skimming, translations of key metadata to aid discoverability, linking to relevant resources such as blogs/videos/press releases, and using tools to share their work through social and traditional media. The results of these actions are measurable and all link the reader back to the version of record on the publisher’s site.

Smith, David (2013-12-17). “What is Kudos? An Interview with David Sommer, Co-Founder”. The Scholarly Kitchen. Retrieved 2016-10-24.

Have a look at this handy infographic to see how using Kudos is helping Huddersfield researchers to share their work

Huddersfield Kudos Infographic
Huddersfield Kudos Infographic