Tag: ~Open Access

Welcome to Rebecca – our new student helper

Welcome to Rebecca – our new student helper

 

Hi everyone, I’m delighted to be a part of the University press team, working as the new student helper. I’m currently a third year English Literature with Creative Writing student, but as part of the team I’ll be organising social media posts and advertising, and writing blog posts (hopefully better than this one).

I’m quite a creative person, so after my studies, I would like to venture into advertising or creative copyrighting. While at the University Press, I hope to broaden my experience within the professional world of marketing and publishing, and I’m looking forward to seeing what these next couple of months brings.

Alongside work and university, I enjoy writing prose fiction and poetry in my spare time, as well as painting the odd picture and writing reviews and articles for my personal blog. This is slowly turning into the ‘personal profile’ section on my CV, so I’m going end it there.

I’ll be involved with lots of exciting journal and book projects over the next few months, so watch this space!

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Fields journal: opportunities for Huddersfield students to get published

Fields journal: opportunities for Huddersfield students to get published

Are you an undergraduate student who is interested in submitting your work to a professional research journal? Fields: journal of Huddersfield student research is a yearly publication, which showcases outstanding research from all seven schools within the university. Submissions can be in the form of a journal article or even a collection of poetry, music scores, photographs or a case study. To take part, get in touch with your dissertation/project tutor, or visit the Fields website to contact a member of the editorial team to see how you could be published in this year’s edition.

Benefits of getting published:

  • Raise the profile of your work and get interest and feedback from other academics and professionals.
  • Gain experience of the publishing process and a professional publication to enhance your CV.
  • Benefit from the support of a professional team through a writing retreat and drop in advice session.
  • Receive a £400 bursary upon submission of your final article.

How to get involved

Once you have contacted a member of our editorial team, or your tutor, they will put you in touch with the publishing team to find out about the submission, review and publishing process.

Publishing in Fields is a fantastic opportunity to take your studies and degree to the next level, the Fields journal is an accredited, well-respected publication, that encourages its authors to aspire to more –check out our blog posts from previous Fields authors to find out what they thought of the opportunity.

 

 

 

New issue of the Journal of Performance and Mindfulness

New issue of the Journal of Performance and Mindfulness

The new issue of our popular journal Performance and Mindfulness has arrived! The new issue focuses on the importance of spirituality within dramatic performance and asks for its readers to re-think individual meditation. It considers how meditation and Buddhist practices are important in the execution of the dramatic arts.

This issue is a fantastic read for those who are keen performers interested in physicality and mindfulness, but it may also spark interest in those who are keen to broaden their horizons within their own perspectives of spirituality. The articles cover all corners of performance art, including;

Performance and Mindfulness includes original work from researchers at the University of Huddersfield, but also from academics across the globe. Read on to discover a wide range of perspectives on what spirituality within performance means to the individual, and how it manifests and expresses itself within other cultures and the independent performer.

Volume 2 Issue 1 of Perfomance and Mindfulness

New Editor for Crime, Security and Society

New Editor for Crime, Security and Society

Dr Anna Williams has taken over as the new Editor of Crime, Security and Society. Their latest issue was published in December 2018.

I was delighted to have taken over the Editorship of the Crime, Security and Society journal from Dr Jason Roach earlier this year.

I am currently Principal Enterprise Fellow (equivalent to Reader) in Forensic Anthropology and Deputy Director of the Secure Societies Institute at the University of Huddersfield. In both of these roles, I am passionate about furthering multi-disciplinary research into crime prevention, detection and analysis, so that criminals can be brought to justice quickly and correctly.

My background is in Archaeology and Anthropology (MA, Oxford, 1998), Forensic Anthropology (MSc, Bradford, 1999) and my PhD (Sheffield, 2005) was in estimating the trauma-death interval of bone fractures using immunohistochemical and histological techniques. This had particular application to the diagnosis of child abuse, when the ‘age’ of the fracture can be compared to the care-givers’ testimony. I worked at Cranfield University as a post-doctoral researcher (2004-6) and then as a Lecturer in Forensic Anthropology (2006-13). I joined the University of Huddersfield in 2013 as a Senior Lecturer and was promoted to Principal Enterprise Fellow in 2015. I currently run the MSc in Forensic Anthropology and am Module Leader for the BSc and MSci Forensic and Analytical Science courses.

My specialism is in decomposition and taphonomy research – I do empirical research to determine the effect of certain conditions on decomposition rate for more accurate post-mortem interval estimation. I am currently investigating the possibility of creating the first Human Taphonomy Facility in the UK, a safe, outdoor laboratory where rigorous, scientifically and ethically sound empirical research can be carried out on donated human cadavers to understand decomposition in UK climates, conditions and soils. I am also very interested in mass disaster management, and run the Forensic Aspects of Disaster module on the MSc Risk, Disaster and Emergency Management. As an anthropologist, I tend to take a holistic approach to research and analysis, and I am acutely aware of the value of looking at problems from different perspectives.

I am excited about the opportunities for cross-pollination and collaboration that the Crime, Security and Society journal will provide. The journal is meant as a forum to bring together academics and practitioners (for example: police, law enforcers, crime analysts, policy makers, security personnel) to share their current findings and experiences and ideas. Challenges aired and shared can be tackled. Cutting edge research disseminated through the journal could put into practice for everyday crime investigation. The Editorial Board and I have big ideas for the future of the Crime, Security and Society journal, and want it to be an engaging, motivating space. We welcome contributions about current news items, such as responses to newspaper or online articles; profiles of professionals in related fields; reviews of books or articles in other journals; and commentaries.

Please contact me if you would like to contribute anything relevant.

Find out more about Crime, Security and Society

University of Huddersfield Press first to launch with Janeway – a new open source publishing platform for open access research

University of Huddersfield Press first to launch with Janeway – a new open source publishing platform for open access research

We are excited and proud to be the first university press to officially launch on the new Janeway publishing platform – all our publications are now available open access on the new platform, which offers a beautifully designed and highly intuitive reader and author experience.

Working with the Open Library of Humanities

Today is the culmination for over 12 months of hard work behind the scenes to get the platform ready, and we would like to thank Martin Paul Eve, Andy Byers and Mauro Sanchez for their endless enthusiasm for the vast amount of work involved. The team at the Open Library of Humanities, based in Birkbeck, University of London’s Centre for Technology and Publishing, have been supportive throughout the process and we are thrilled to have a portfolio of journals and monographs now all available on the new platform.

Professor Martin Paul Eve, CEO of OLH and Director of Birkbeck’s Centre for Technology and Publishing said:

“we are thrilled to be able to collaborate with Huddersfield University Press. When we started the Janeway project, it was for our internal use; we simply wanted an open-source platform that we could control ourselves. For others to now benefit from that same system allows us to spread the infrastructural side of open access much further than we would otherwise have been able.”

Celebrating the success of the University of Huddersfield Press

To announce the launch of the platform, and to mark the recent achievements of the Press, Huddersfield’s Deputy Vice-Chancellor Professor Tim Thornton, Chair of the University Press Board, opened a celebration event this morning attended by Deans, Directors, authors and editors. The Press has recently achieved two impressive milestones in research dissemination:

  • Over 100,000 article downloads (since 2016)
  • Over 6000 book downloads (since 2016)

This is a significant achievement and shows how the Press can play a part in ensuring high quality research is accessible for everyone. We look forward to seeing the dissemination and impact of our publications improve even further as we publish our new content on this improved platform.

 

 

New book! Soundings: documentary film and the listening experience

New book! Soundings: documentary film and the listening experience

We are delighted today to announce the publication of our newest book, a beautifully written collection edited by Geoffrey Cox and John Corner:

Soundings: documentary film and the listening experience

Buy the paperback version

Download the open access version

It has been a privilege to work with Geoffrey and John on this fascinating collection of essays, and we asked them to put a few words together about their research and the driving force behind the book.

Geoffrey Cox and John Corner explore the arts of sound, investigating the richness of what we hear as well as what we see in non-fiction films.

We all recognise that sound is important to documentary films, without it we would often have no idea of what we were looking at or of its significance. What is far less recognised is the often complex ways in which our listening becomes interlinked with our viewing so as to generate feelings and ideas well beyond those carried simply in ‘what is said’. This is partly a matter of how documentary producers work to let us hear the world as well as see it, a world of noises, natural, and mechanical and of patterns and textures of speech going well beyond the literal content of commentary or interview. The sonic dimension involves a range of technological and aesthetic creativity in the production process right through from initial recording through to final editing. Often, it importantly involves the use of music in ways which we might be encouraged to register but which will often work powerfully in the background, shaping the kinds of knowledge and pleasure we get from a film without our being consciously aware of it.

A huge range of non-fiction film uses sounds in this way to guide and supplement our visual experience and fill it with feeling. The longstanding practices of film, television and now web advertising show a range of sound designs importantly at work, so too do the even more longstanding techniques of film propaganda. However, many documentary and video makers, rather than reinforce the delivery of a narrow message, have wanted to use the possibilities of different sounds to enrich, make more complex and perhaps even challenge, the sense of reality ‘coming through’.

In our work, drawing on international contributors including film-makers and composers as well as academics, we ask questions about how sounds are recorded and assembled in documentary production, about the variety of the ways in which they work when listened to and about their contribution to making this area of visual culture an important culture of sounds too. Our belief is that further critical attention here goes beyond the expanding area of documentary scholarship and connects with a broader understanding of the contemporary media arts.

Buy the paperback version

Download the open access version

Politics and society in contemporary fiction – author interview with Ruby Cowling

Politics and society in contemporary fiction – author interview with Ruby Cowling

Ruby Cowling is one of the authors published in our collection of poetry and prose, I You He She It, published earlier this year. In this blog post she talks about how fiction writing can be an outlet for your own viewpoints, but also a way to explore societal issues.

Something to say? Tell a story

In my current work-in-progress, a novel, I have found myself writing about data privacy, corporate power, manipulative advertising, the mental health of young people and the ethical questions surrounding artificial intelligence. Put that way, it sounds as if I’m writing some polemic, banging a drum for a whole range of troublesome issues, trying to do with fiction something I could do better through journalism or social action.

Maybe it’s cowardice. This way I can afford to put my head just slightly above the parapet, because I always have the excuse that it’s fiction. It was the character that made me say it!

But then, fiction has always done this – acted as a Trojan Horse to smuggle in disruptive messages about us as humans, about our society, about things we should be questioning if we’re going to progress in a humane way. Storytelling’s oral tradition, in particular, has been one of the most effective and enduring methods of resisting repressive power. So the guise of entertainment is not, I think, an ignoble one.

That’s the difference, though, between polemic and storytelling. The entertainment value.

The holy grail for me – as a reader as well as a writer – is a great story laid on a bed of, for want of a better phrase, “serious issues”. Story is hard. With my work-in-progress, I’ve actually found the story much harder to bring out than those issues, and have had to fight to prioritise it when the many “serious themes” have been falling over each other to be heard. But I knew I didn’t want to end up with some rant. I want readers to have a good time, first and foremost. Two spoonfuls of sugar to help the medicine go down.

A note on the medicine

I think contemporary British society is particularly under-addressed in our (contemporary British) fiction. There are plenty of exceptions, of course, but there’s a tendency to avoid referencing the enormous changes we’re going through – and a trend in publishing for nostalgia and “the known” (historical fiction; books based on true stories or real people) – and the risk is, we’re creating a cultural gap.

With technological and societal change affecting us so profoundly and so rapidly, our modern world is bewildering, it’s true. Further, I understand that for a huge number of people reading, as a leisure activity, is an escape; I appreciate that they want to be taken elsewhere, not forced to relive a printed copy of the tough day they’ve just had.

I mean, I’d love to be able to write poetically about the idyllic worlds of yesteryear, simple folk pursuing lyrical lives in the fresh air and so on, but apart from the fact I don’t have that skill, it just doesn’t seem honest. Instead I keep finding myself back chewing over the messy stuff we’re dealing with here and now.

Ironically, that often means I write speculatively about a very-near-future or just-slightly-alternative-present – as in the novel I’ve been working on. But that just takes us back to the storytelling tradition. Don’t tell it straight, or it risks being a rant. (And, it’s important to mention, in some societies it risks the wrath of the powers you’re questioning.) Twist it, reshape it, douse it in story. Make it an allegory, a metaphor, an glorious adventure. Ideally, the reader will come away saying Wow, I had a great time with that story – and it really made me think.

You can also purchase a print copy of I You He She It here.