Happy World Poetry Day – sneak preview

Happy World Poetry Day – sneak preview

As today is #WorldPoetryDay we thought it apt to do a preview of our newest book, I You He She It – Experiments in Viewpoint. This beautiful collection of prose and poetry is compiled by the School of Music, Humanities and Media at the University of Huddersfield and brings together established writers and emerging talent from all over the UK.

You can order the book in print or access the full open access version on our website.

Here is one of the poems from the book, by poet Gaia Holmes.

It

It made her want to drink the last of the Christmas sherry, climb over the park railings after midnight and cry at Adonis’s feet.

It made him want to phone in sick and spend the rest of the day in bed with her eating treacle sponge and custard, playing chess.

It made them want to go to the next alcoholics anonymous meeting.

It made him want to go to the woods with a week’s supply of cream crackers, tinned sardines and his dead grandmother’s fat three-stone bible.

It made him want to pull out his tubes, curse at the nurses and shuffle to the gardens to smoke a cigarette.

It made them want to adopt.

It made her want to touch his wife’s breasts to see if they were real.

It made them want to drive to the seaside on a rainy day, park up on the cliff top, eat egg mayonnaise sandwiches, drink tea from a thermos flask and watch the grey waves curling and rolling through the steamy windows.

It made him want to apologise.

It made her want to murder.

It made her want to wear Doc Martens and a chiffon dress the colour of ostrich steak.

It made him want to go to the library and borrow a book on goat husbandry.

It made her want to paint all the windows with bitumen, burn all his letters and cry for six weeks.

It made him want to eat fried rice with a pair of tweezers.

It made them want to slow-roast the placenta in a casserole dish with Bisto, onions and leeks.

It made him want to pour treacle into the toecaps of all his trainers.

It made him want to teach his Jack Russell how to iron.

It made her want to set fire to her Barbie doll’s hair.

It made her want to move to Russia, gorge on roast turnips and black bread and become comfortably fat.

It made him want to stroke her clavicles.

It made her want to wear a fake moustache at the wedding reception.

It made him want to curl up in a fist at the bottom of her bed.

It made him want to steal a wedge of Brie from Sainsbury’s deli counter.

It made her want to sell her soul on eBay.

It made her want to try it when her parents were out.

It made him want to think about it for a long time in the bath.

It made them want to forget about it and get on with their lives.

 

 

Author spotlight: how important are nuptial agreements?

Author spotlight: how important are nuptial agreements?

Paralegal Helen Newman has recently published an article about her research in our student research journal Fields. We caught up with her for a chat about her work and her experiences getting published.

I am not a writer, not really. I am a case loaded paralegal working for a specialist criminal practice. I may write the occasional blog post for work based upon cases I have managed but for the most part my writing is restricted to Briefs to counsel, Statements and Letters with the occasional Application to court. I returned to University as a mature student to do the Graduate Diploma in Law – urged to do so by my employer and family – so getting my head around writing from an academic perspective was a challenge in itself. The article on prenuptial agreements is based upon my dissertation on the same subject. I have to admit that my choice of dissertation subject was guided by my desire to structure my study – this felt like a topic I could remain focused on – unlike something like medical negligence where I feared I could end up going off on a tangent. Working in a criminal practice I had no involvement in family law to be aware of the increasing desire of parties to protect their assets ahead of marriage and very much thought of ‘pre-nups’ as something for the rich and famous, for celebrities, but as I researched the subject I was fascinated to discover the popularity of them across Europe and found I really got into the topic. It did seem nonsensical that business partners can sign a contract but life partners couldn’t, or rather that the court would consider them differently.

My research involved me becoming familiar with a new area of law, and a new style of writing. In Criminal practice I may read a few articles but the focus is more on court judgements, so I had to get used to reading family law journals and books on the subject – often with quite political undertones. It was interesting to have the opportunity to consider different viewpoints on the same case – though in many ways it appeared that the judgement itself was welcomed, more that the authors differed on the difference it would actually make going forward. I had also never had to read government white papers before – this in itself was an experience – as there seemed to be several all saying the same thing for much of the papers. Nor was I used to things being so open at the end of a matter – in the criminal law a higher court gives its ruling and that stands until challenged – this was about investigating the possibility of a required change to the law – with the final outcome seeming to be that there was no actual outcome and that further consultation may be needed in the future.

The opportunity to develop my dissertation into an article for publication was an exciting, if not daunting, one. Not only did it require a different style of writing, free of legal jargon, but it also needed me to expand upon some areas whilst removing others as I still had a word count limit! It was a brilliant experience, especially having the copywriter’s feedback to highlight where I needed to make things clearer. I would certainly urge anyone who is given this opportunity to go for it!

Read Helen’s article in Volume 3 of Fields

London Book Fair 2017 – academic publishing

London Book Fair 2017 – academic publishing

For many publishers and authors this week the big event is London Book Fair. Running from the 14th-16th March in Olympia in London, this year there will be over 25000 visitors from 124 different countries.

Although we won’t be there this year I thought it might be handy to do a quick roundup of the research/academic activities going on during the fair.

Follow the LBF Blog

First of all, keep up to date by checking out the London Book Fair Blog – there are some great posts on there from Alastair Horne who gives a monthly summary of academic publishing news

Research and Scholarly Publishing Forum

If you are attending #LBF2017 be sure to register for the Research and Scholarly Publishing Forum on the 15th March:

Research and scholarly publishing faces unprecedented change. Digitisation has turned the concept of territoriality and the supply chain upside down. Different international approaches to funding in higher education and research mandates are not only affecting institutions, but also publishers.

What are these trends and what do they mean for scholarly publishing?

Join industry leaders as they share their global perspectives and strategic insight into the latest policy, publishing models and technologies.

Insights Seminar Programme

As part of the Insights Seminar Programme there is also a Scholarly Stream with 13 sessions running Tuesday -Thursday covering subjects including authentication, copyright, journal sales, technology in book publishing and open access publishing.

Grab a discount

We are offering our readers 50% off our print books during #LBF17 – just select the student option at the checkout to get a bargain!

 

Stay connected

Finally, download the LBF app to make your visit a socially connected one. The app helps you find your way around and schedule your days, but also lets you connect with other visitors to the fair and follow social media streams to keep up to date.

Author spotlight: how does shift work affect healthcare students?

Author spotlight: how does shift work affect healthcare students?

Healthcare student Geri Gee has recently published an article about her research in our student research journal Fields. We caught up with her for a chat about her work and her experiences getting published.

How would you explain your research to someone new to the subject?

My research was designed to address the needs of healthcare students undergoing an academic degree, in order to practice in their relevant field, such as; nursing/ midwifery. It was evident from a literature review that there was little to no research supporting and identifying the impact of shift work on healthcare students. The literature review highlighted significant implications to shift work, therefore the team I worked with felt it necessary to explore how these implications could affect a healthcare professional so prematurely in their career and how these implications would impact on the future health of individuals and that of the national health service and its retention of healthcare professionals.

As a first time author, how did you find the process of getting published?

Having my work chosen to be published was very exciting. The step by step process required a fair amount of my personal time, in between applying for and commencing new employment. It was an educational process that was supported by the Press, who were very instructive and succinct in their advice. It was a both challenging and rewarding process.

How do you think this experience has helped you develop new skills?

Publishing my article has educated me on the difference between writing an assignment and writing for an academic journal. I feel that the process has encouraged me to consider further study and given me a drive to become involved in clinical research as the impact of the outcomes can be of a significant nature. I believe that my writing skills have improved alongside my skills to review reliability of research, which ensures practice based reading contributes to changing my personal practice, committing to meeting the current needs of the service users.

Read Geri’s article in Volume 3 of Fields

New issue of student research journal Fields

New issue of student research journal Fields

Launched in 2015, Fields is quite unique as a journal in that it gives students, both undergraduate and postgraduate, the chance to publish their work through a rigorous academic peer review process. As well as giving a platform to this excellent research, the process gives the students valuable experience of the publishing process – something which they can draw on if they choose to pursue a career in academia.

Following the great success of Volume 1 and Volume 2, we are pleased to announce that Volume 3 is now available to read on our open access publishing platform.

Read Volume 3 of Fields

Professor Janet Hargreaves has been Editor for the journal for two years, and has enjoyed seeing the journal develop from its first issue:

Having been involved with the development of this journal from its beginnings as an editorial board member, and for the past two years as editor, I feel privileged to have read such an excellent body of student work, and to be presenting the papers for this third volume.

Professor Janet Hargreaves, Editorial

In this new issue we have an impressively diverse range of subjects including literature, pharmacy, social care and engineering to name a few.  It is very rewarding to see such high quality work being produced by students across all of the seven Schools at the University.

Over the coming months we will be publishing blog posts by the authors to give you an insight into their research and their experiences of being published in Fields, so watch this space!

Congratulations to all the students for their hard work throughout the process.

Writing ‘boot’ camp to foster proactive and supportive writing cultures for undergraduates.

With Volume 3 of Fields about to be published, we are enjoying looking back at the development work @tali_hud has been doing with undergraduate researchers

Teaching and Learning Institute

The Teaching and Learning Institute logoThe Teaching and Learning Institute is gathering short case studies of academic practice to enable colleagues to share their approaches to teaching and learning more widely and encourage interdisciplinary and interprofessional learning.

The Teaching and Learning Institute coordinates, evaluates and disseminates inspiring and innovative teaching and learning

In this case study, Cheryl Reynolds, senior lecturer in the School of Education and Professional Development, writes about using writing ‘boot camps’. As part of a two-year, blended learning degree in Education, undergraduates need to develop the confidence and expertise to write convincingly about their own educational research. One way to support this is to foster proactive and supportive writing cultures for undergraduates. A two-day, writing ‘boot camp’ that sought to initiate such a culture was devised.

Why did you decide to try this out?

Many students struggle to meet the challenge of writing academically and were frequently requesting more emphasis on academic…

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Celebrating Academic Book Week 2017

Celebrating Academic Book Week 2017

Happy Academic Book Week 2017!

Following on from the success of Academic Book Week 2016, this international celebration of academic books is back for a second year with a focus on diversity, innovation and influence.

At the University of Huddersfield Press we are really proud of our academic book portfolio, and are particularly excited about our open access publications programme, which is set to continue to expand over the next few years.

Publishing our academic research books both in print and as online open access versions gives us the opportunity to widen our readership and really achieve one of our main objectives: to make high quality research available and accessible to all.

There is a great range of seminars, debates and lectures on throughout this week to celebrate the academic book, and we will be following #AcBookWeek and @AcBookWeek to keep up to date.

I have curated a brief list below of the online events this week but for full details visit the official site: https://acbookweek.com/

Monday 23rd

Altmetric for books: tracking engagement and driving discovery

Time: 15:30 – 16:30

http://wp.me/p6gmfO-5H

Napier University and Blackwell’s Edinburgh: Innovations in Learning and Teaching Giveaway

Time: January 23 – 27

Location: online

https://twitter.com/innovationsenu.

CABI: ABW Social Media Competitions and Special Offer

Time: January 23 – 27

https://www.facebook.com/CABI.development/

January 24

Atwood Tate: Finding a Job in Academic Publishing Q&A

Time: January 24

https://twitter.com/AtwoodTate (Jan 24)

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1by5dRyeN-OB7F0VV3CyLQ (Jan 27)

Liverpool University Press: Using Primary Sources Launch

Time: January 24

www.library.biblioboard.com/module/usingprimarysources

January 25

Brill Publishing: Digital Humanities at Brill 

Time: 13:30 – 14:30

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3777979507739788545

January 26

LIVE TWITTER DEBATE: Is there a place for independent publishing in the academic world?

Time: 14:00 – 15:00 GMT

Twitter – use #indyacademics and #acbookweek to join the debate