Family History Month

October is Family History Month, and here at the University of Huddersfield Press we are proud to be part of the thriving local history scene in Huddersfield. We have a great collection of history-based research for you to indulge in, and to perhaps learn something new this Family History Month.

rollMargaret Stansfield’s ‘Huddersfield’s Roll of Honour 1914-1922’, serves as a detailed account of 3,439 service personnel from Huddersfield who lost their lives during the First World War. This touching account remembers those who gave their lives for our country, and honours and represents Stansfield’s lifetime work, who sadly passed away in 2012. Who knows, you may discover a name you recognise amongst the lists of honoured soldiers. You can browse the book online or order a printed copy.

The Making of a University by John O’Connell introduces us makingto the development records of the institution that is now The University of Huddersfield. From the early nineteenth century, where it began as a place of learning to promote the education of the working classes, to becoming a mechanics institution, a female educational institute, and a polytechnic, before, finally, becoming the institution we know today. The late John O’Connell’s original research now resides at the University archives, but you can purchase a print copy of the book for yourself.

slavery.jpgJohn Hargreaves and Hilary Haigh’s Slavery in Yorkshire introduces us to the darker side of our local history. This book explores the many ways in which Richard Oastler set about campaigning and aiding the abolishment of child labour in the Industrial Revolution. This fascinating book opens the readers eyes to the real attitudes towards child labour, and the roles the press and the church played in outlawing the enforcement of child labour. You can order your print copy of the book online.beerhouses

Beerhouses, Brothels and Bobbies explores policing methods in Huddersfield in the mid-nineteenth century with author, David Taylor, evaluating the issues facing the local area in a hot bed of the West Riding textile production era. This book is available for free via our website or you can purchase a print copy for your bookshelf.

Visit our website to browse our entire collection of books and journals.

And don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook and keep checking out our blog to keep up to date with the latest news from us.   

Brand new edition of Anthropocosmic Theatre published in print and open access

Brand new edition of Anthropocosmic Theatre published in print and open access

It has been a long wait for the beautiful new edition of Anthropocosmic Theatre. First published in 1996, this 2nd edition is updated, with new chapters and translated content.

Available in a beautiful printed copy, or as an open access download, we are excited to announce the launch of this stunning creative and collaborative work.

Order your print copy

Download an open access copy

We caught up with Deborah Middleton, one of the editors and contributors for the book, to find out what makes this new edition so significant.

How to sum up more than forty-five years of daring adventure in the fields of theatre research and creativity? That was the challenge that faced me as I set about editing a new expanded edition of Anthropocosmic Theatre by the Mexican director, Nicolás Núñez.  The original version of the book, which I had edited way back in 1996 (my first ever foray into academic publishing) reported on Núñez’s development of an approach to theatre that emphasises its ritual and sacred orgins. Núñez and his collaborators had undertaken an extraordinary journey encompassing contact with a wide range of theatre and ritual sources: Tibetan Buddhists in exile in India; Peruvian and Huichol shamans; NASA scientists in Arizona; Strasberg, the father of Method acting, in New York, and Grotowski, the ‘holy theatre’ visionary, in the forests of Poland and the mountains of Mexico.  Now, 20-plus years on, my colleague, Franc Chamberlain, had come up with the idea that we should create a new edition of the book with a second section covering the period from 1996 to 2018. And those years were just as full and intrepid as the early ones had been.

The challenge of the project was in deciding how best to represent the body of work that had flowered from those beginnings – which projects to favour, which inquiries to explore, which adventures to relate.  Inevitably, the book can only be a partial glimpse into a lifelong dedication that has generated a very unique view, and a highly developed practice that has touched multiple lives.  In the end, I chose to focus primarily on ‘the dynamics’ – Núñez’s intensive performer training processes which represent an important contribution to understandings of meditation and energy in actor-training. Shorter case-studies and commentaries give the reader a sense of just a few of the participatory theatre productions. New, and newly translated, writings by Núñez are combined with chapters by other writers, and – in keeping with the original book – a series of short personal reflections by participants.   Once again, we glimpse the extraordinary projects through which Núñez has researched and shared his vision: an overnight performance on each full moon of the year 2000 at the pyramids of Teotihuacan; a 40-day pilgrimage on the pre-Christian route that is now the Camino de Santiago de Compostela;  a creative residency in an indigenous jungle village on the edges of the Darién rainforest in Panama.

This is in part an academic book, but it is also very much a manifesto and a series of testimonials: a manifesto for a theatre of depth, integrity, and sacrality; testimonials to powerful, even life-changing, experiences in the training studio, and in the forests and other spaces where Núnez’s theatre productions take place.  It is a book which is designed to spark the imagination, to evoke an aspirational sense of the power of theatre, and to remind us all of the great cosmic context within which our lives and our art-forms unfold.

We are looking forward to an exciting launch event for the book, to be held at the University of Huddersfield on 30th October.

Order your print copy

Download an open access copy

New journals accepted into the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)

New journals accepted into the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)

We are very excited to announce that, after a lot of hard work at the University of Huddersfield Press offices, and a lot of very helpful guidance, we now have 4 journals accepted into the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)!

We would like to say a big thank you to the DOAJ team for being helpful and supportive throughout the process, and we are very happy to see these high quality, open access journals, indexed and discoverable on the DOAJ platform.

 Journal of Creative Music Systems Tick icon: journal was accepted after March 2014​​
In DOAJ?Yes
ISSN(s): 2399-7656
Date added to DOAJ: 2019-05-30
Home pagehttps://www.jcms.org.uk/
LicenseCC BY-NC-ND
Publisher: University of Huddersfield Press
Platform, Host, Aggregator: Janeway
Classification: Music, Computer software
Keywords: music, creative music systems, computational creative systems
Started publishing Open Access content in: 2016
Country: United Kingdom
Language: EN
Submit an update
 Teaching in Lifelong Learning: A Journal to Inform and Improve Practice Tick icon: journal was accepted after March 2014​​
In DOAJ?Yes
ISSN(s): 2040-0993, 2049-4181
Date added to DOAJ: 2014-11-24
Home pagehttps://www.teachinginlifelonglearning.org.uk
LicenseCC BY-NC-ND
Publisher: University of Huddersfield Press
Platform, Host, Aggregator: Janeway
Classification: Special aspects of education
Keywords: education, lifelong learning, higher education
Started publishing Open Access content in: 2011
Country: United Kingdom
Language: EN
Submit an update
 Journal of Performance Magic Tick icon: journal was accepted after March 2014​​
In DOAJ?Yes
ISSN(s): 2051-6037
Date added to DOAJ: 2015-05-13
Home pagehttp://eprints.hud.ac.uk/journal/jpm/
LicenseCC BY
Publisher: University of Huddersfield Press
Platform, Host, Aggregator: Eprints
Classification: The performing arts. Show business
Keywords: performing arts, magic
Started publishing Open Access content in: 2013
Country: United Kingdom
Language: EN
Submit an update
 Crime, Security and Society Tick icon: journal was accepted after March 2014​​
In DOAJ?Yes
ISSN(s): 2398-130X
Date added to DOAJ: 2019-08-13
Home pagehttps://www.crimesecurityandsociety.org.uk/
LicenseCC BY
Publisher: University of Huddersfield Press
Platform, Host, Aggregator: Janeway
Classification: Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology
Keywords: crime, security, society, criminal investigation, forensic sciences
Started publishing Open Access content in: 2018
Country: United Kingdom
Language: EN
Submit an update
The Invisible Woman: How Henrietta Schwann helped shape the history of female working class education

The Invisible Woman: How Henrietta Schwann helped shape the history of female working class education

The old saying, ‘women should be seen, not heard’, seems archaic in today’s society. And yet the silencing of women’s voices and opinions is something we see in today’s world on a regular basis. Decisions made by politicians about women’s rights over their own bodies, and the escalating levels of abuse prominent female figures face online, are both proof that there are still those who work to silence women’s voices. It is important that we learn from the powerful actions of female figures in history, and continue to strive for the rights and recognition of all members of society.

uniA significant figure in the history of women’s rights in Huddersfield was Henrietta Schwann.

Henrietta and her husband, Friederich, eventually became the founders of the educational organisation that now resides as the University of Huddersfield. The Female Educational Institute and The Young Men’s Mental Improvement Society, founded by Friederich, merged in 1841 to form the Huddersfield Technical School and Mechanics Institute.

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Henrietta Schwann is credited as being a vital figurehead in the founding of the school for female education, which provided evening classes to women and girls in the Huddersfield area for over thirty years before the union, and continued to do so under its new name.

Henrietta, her husband and her brother, Samuel recognised the need for affordable female education. For women who grew up in working class areas, such as the industrial heart of 19th-century Huddersfield, these few hours of tutelage per week made the difference between finding employment or staying at home, therefore enabling women take control of their own lives and finances.

schwannHowever, this woman, a figurehead of the promotion of female education into mainstream schooling, remains faceless; with no images of her remaining in existence today. Sadly, we can’t even know if any pictures were taken of her when she was alive, though we know what her husband looks like – his face welcomes you through the doors of the Schwann Building on the University campus. Although the building itself is named after both the Schwanns, it is unfortunate that her husband is all we have to remember Henrietta’s legacy by.

The lack of her portrait serves as a reminder of the tendency to exclude and silence female voices, something which we all have a duty to recognise and fight against.

 

You can check out our book The Making of a University by John O’Connell if you want to learn more about the fascinating foundations of the university.

Be sure to follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook to keep up-to-date with the latest news and releases!